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The Bible is the most remarkable collection ever written.
Over a period of two thousand years; in times of war and peace. Written by kings, physicians, tax collectors, farmers, fishermen, singers, and shepherds. Written in three languages - Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. Such a diverse group of writers, yet this cohesive unity is inspired and perfected by the Holy Spirit Himself. Jesus Christ is the grand subject, our good is its design, and the glory of God is its end.

"Breathing life into all who believe...The Word is alive!" (Casting Crowns - Word is Alive)

"All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work." 2 Tim. 3:16-17



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Daily Quote

  • "We have peace with God by the righteousness of Christ, and peace of conscience by the fruits of righteousness in ourselves."—Thomas MantonⒸ 1996-2020 Heartlight, Inc. This material may not be reproduced in part or whole for commercial use without written consent.

Saint of the Day

  • St. Gerald was an English monk, and the bishop of Mayo. The date of his birth is unknown, however we do know that after the Synod of Whitby in 664, he followed St. Colman to Ireland, and settled in Innisboffin, in 668. After some time, dissensions arose between the Irish and the English monks, and St. Colman decided to found a separate monastery for the thirty English brethren. Thus arose the Abbey of Mayo, known as "Mayo of the Saxons," with St. Gerald as the first abbot in 670. St. Bede writes: "This monastery is to this day, 731, occupied by English monks...and contains an exemplary body who gathered there from England, and live by the labour of their own hands (after the manner of the early Fathers), under a rule and canonical abbot, leading chaste and single lives." Although St. Gerald was a comparatively young man, he proved to be a wise ruler, and governed Mayo until 697, when, it is said, he resigned in favor of St. Adamnan. Some authors hold that St. Adamnan celebrated the Roman Easter at Mayo in 703, and then went to Skreen, in Hy Fiachrach, and that after his departure the monks prevailed on St. Gerald to resume the abbacy.  Mayo, though merged in Tuam for a time, remained a separate see until 1579. The Saxon saint continued to govern the Abbey and Diocese of Mayo till his death on died March 13, 731. His feast is celebrated on December 5.

Daily Reading - Maronite